Medical

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Leave blank for all. Otherwise, the first selected term will be the default instead of "Any".
  1. Contraband (intoxicants and illegal items of any nature)
    Carry On Baggage:
    No
    Checked Baggage:
    No
    Please note that this is an illegal item under the Criminal Code of Canada; if it is presented at a pre-board screening checkpoint, protocol requires us to notify the police. This could lead to charges and prosecution to the item’s holder.
  2. Cough syrup
    Carry On Baggage:
    Yes
    Checked Baggage:
    Yes
    These items are considered to be essential non-prescription medications. You are allowed to carry volumes greater than 100 ml (3.4 oz.) in your carry-on baggage. These liquids must be declared to the Screening Officer separately. See our information on liquids for more details.
  3. Cream
    Carry On Baggage:
    Yes (<100ml)
    Checked Baggage:
    Yes

    100 ml (3.4 oz.) or smaller container permitted in carry-on. Some creams may be considered an essential non-prescription medication and will be exempt from the liquid restrictions (Neosporin, rash creams and other first-aid creams).

  4. Cremated remains
    Carry On Baggage:
    Yes
    Checked Baggage:
    Yes

    Cremated remains in a container may be packed as part of your carry-on baggage. The container, however, must pass separately through the x-ray machine. Please see our information on the special procedures in place for screening cremated remains at http://www.catsa.gc.ca/cremated-remains for more detail.

  5. Day-by-day pill separator
    Carry On Baggage:
    Yes
    Checked Baggage:
    Yes

    Bringing a day-by-day pill separator is not an issue for security; however, there may be other considerations about travelling with medication, especially when travelling outside of Canada. We recommend finding out more at http://travel.gc.ca/travelling/health-safety/medication.

  6. Decongestant spray
    Carry On Baggage:
    Yes
    Checked Baggage:
    Yes

    These items are considered to be essential non-prescription medications. You are allowed to carry volumes greater than 100 ml (3.4 oz.) in your carry-on baggage. These liquids must be declared to the Screening Officer separately. See our information on liquids for more details.

  7. Diabetic supplies
    Carry On Baggage:
    Yes
    Checked Baggage:
    Yes

    Diabetic supplies and equipment such as syringes, insulin auto-injectors, jet injectors, and pumps are permitted. Syringes must be for personal medical use, and the needle guard must be in place. The person must possess medication that is to be administered by means of the syringe or needle and biojectors.

    Liquid medications (e.g. insulin) are exempted from the liquid restrictions (including gel or ice packs to refrigerate the medication) and can be carried in carry-on baggage in volumes larger than 100 ml (3.4 oz.). Juice and gel for passengers who indicate a need for such items to address a diabetic condition are also permitted. Any liquids, juice or gels must be declared to the Screening Officer separately.

    To facilitate screening, CATSA recommends that the medication be properly labelled (professionally printed label identifying the medication or a manufacturer’s name or pharmaceutical label).

  8. Eye drops
    Carry On Baggage:
    Yes
    Checked Baggage:
    Yes
    These items are considered to be essential non-prescription medications. You are allowed to carry volumes greater than 100 ml (3.4 oz.) in your carry-on baggage. These liquids must be declared to the Screening Officer separately. See our information on liquids for more details.
  9. Gel cap pills
    Carry On Baggage:
    Yes
    Checked Baggage:
    Yes
    These items are considered to be essential non-prescription medications. You are allowed to carry volumes greater than 100 ml (3.4 oz.) in your carry-on baggage. These liquids must be declared to the Screening Officer separately. See our information on liquids for more details.
  10. Gel packs
    Carry On Baggage:
    Yes (<100ml)
    Checked Baggage:
    Yes
    100 ml (3.4 oz.) or smaller container permitted in carry-on. Gel and ice packs are subject to the liquid restrictions. They are exempt from the restrictions on liquids when required to treat an injury or when used to refrigerate baby food, milk, breast milk, formula, water and juice for infants under 2 years of age (0-24 months), medically necessary items and medication.

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